Hepatitis E Response in Refugee Settings (UNHCR, 2015)

This brief is intended to highlight key elements of an effective response to an outbreak of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in refugee setting. It focuses on specific response actions, including the review of common risks associated with health, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The overall implementation of response actions and mode of operation should be context specific, as highlighted by the examples given from Dadaab (Ifo) Kenya and South Sudan.

Water Quality Study in Refugee Operations (UNHCR and SMU, 2011)

The SMU team conducted five sampling missions to UNHCR refugee camps in Uganda, Kenya, Bangladesh, Djibouti, and Liberia. Overall, these missions were considered a success with 17 camps, 7 villages, and a few additional sites visited. The team collected 213 camp samples and 229 total samples for analyses in the laboratory. Camp conditions and source water characteristics varied widely amongst the five countries but also within the camps themselves.

Sustainable Groundwater Management for Refugee Camps in Dadaab, Kenya (UNHCR and Université de Neuchâtel, 2013)

Close to half a million refugees live in Dadaab, Kenya and rely on groundwater from the Merti Aquifer. Preliminary hydrogeological mapping indicates over exploitation of the fresh water aquifer could result in salt water intrusion, which would put the security of water supply for the refugee camps and host population at risk. UNHCR together with University of Neuchâtel has embarked on a comprehensive study of the Merti Aquifer including remote monitoring, and numerical modelling of the aquifer in order to develop a sustainable groundwater management plan for the aquifer which supplies water to all the refugee camps in Dadaab, Kenya.

Water Safety Plan for Dadaab Refugee Camps (CDC, 2009)

Water safety plan produced by CDC following a technical support visit to Dadaab in 2009. The report contains: An overview of Dadaab water supply system; Identification of hazards and risks; Control measures and prioritisation of risks; Sanitation and hygiene; and Conclusions.