UNHCR WASH Resources

Compendium of Accessible WASH Technologies


This document contains examples of WASH technologies are that users can use to make their WASH facilities accessible to users with disabilities.


WASH in Health Facilities Checklist (UNHCR, 2020)


The UNHCR WASH Monitoring System includes monitoring of refugee health facilities following the Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) guidelines, model questions and standard indicators. All refugee health facilities should be surveyed at least once a year. Indicators are tracked on the Refugee WASH in Health Facilities Dashboard.


WASH in Schools Checklist (UNHCR, 2020)


The UNHCR WASH Monitoring System includes monitoring of refugee schools following the Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) guidelines, model questions and standard indicators. All refugee schools should be surveyed at least once a year. Indicators are tracked on the Refugee WASH in Schools Dashboard.


COVID-19 Training Webinar: Preparedness for Safe Refugee Schools (UNHCR, 2020)


This training powerpoint presentation was used as part of a webinar for preparedness for safe operation of schools in refugee settings with relation to COVID-19. The webinar describes the rationale of data collection, how the data collection should be carried out, prioritised locations, timeline and specific practical training on mobile data collection using Open Data Kit (ODK) Collect.


    Core Questions and Indicators for Monitoring WASH in Health Care Facilities (JMP, 2018)


    This document presents recommended core questions to support harmonised monitoring of WASH in health care facilities as part of the SDGs. The core indicators and questions in this guide were developed by the Global Task Team for Monitoring WASH in HCF, convened by the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply, Sanitation
    and Hygiene (JMP), and working under the auspices of the Global Action Plan on WASH in HCF. They are derived from current global normative documents, national standards and regulations, questions that have been used in facility assessment surveys and censuses, and the normative criteria of the human rights to water and sanitation: accessibility, availability, quality and acceptability.


      Core Questions and Indicators for Monitoring WASH in Schools (JMP, 2018)


      This document presents recommended core questions to support harmonised monitoring of WASH in schools as part of the SDGs. The questions in this guide were agreed upon by the Global Task Team for Monitoring WASH in Schools
      in the SDGs, convened by the Joint Monitoring Programme for Water and Sanitation (JMP). They are based on the current global norms, existing national standards, questions in national censuses and multi-national surveys, global WASH in schools monitoring recommendations, and normative human rights criteria: availability, acceptability, accessibility and quality.


      Water Supply in Protracted Humanitarian Crisis (OXFAM, UNHCR, 2020)


      This paper looks in more detail at the concept of sustainability of water supply in protracted crisis and sets out a number of factors that should be considered if better service delivery arrangements are to be achieved.


      WASH Emerging Practices and COVID-19 (UNHCR, 2020)


      The following document details specific, innovative WASH programmes related to COVID-19 in UNHCR field operations in Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Iraq, Rwanda, South Sudan, Sudan, and Zimbabwe.


      Waste-to-Value Sanitation in Kakuma Refugee Camp


      In response to a call for sanitation solutions for difficult ground conditions in refugee settings, Sanivation introduced an innovative market-based solution with a waste-to-value component to Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya. This report examines the business model and financial model that Sanivation developed during the project and illustrates some of the real world challenges and opportunities for waste-to-value sanitation. It is hoped that the insights from this research will provide a useful reference for potential investors and entrepreneurs, as well as humanitarian practitioners looking to design self-sustaining waste-to-value sanitation services in refugee and low-resource settings in the future.